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Strawberries and cream – a tea party at Ribblesdale for all to enjoy (25/6/15)

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Sunday Herald editor  Richard Walker at Journalist Charity cheque presentation at Urban Brasserie, St Vincent St, Glasgow. Picture Robert Perry for The Herald and  Evening Times 22nd June 2015 Must credit photo to Robert Perry FEE PAYABLE FOR REPRO USE FEE PAYABLE FOR ALL INTERNET USE www.robertperry.co.uk NB -This image is not to be distributed without the prior consent of the copyright holder. in using this image you agree to abide by terms and conditions as stated in this caption. All monies payable to Robert Perry (PLEASE DO NOT REMOVE THIS CAPTION) This image is intended for Editorial use (e.g. news). Any commercial or promotional use requires additional clearance.  Copyright 2014 All rights protected. first use only contact details Robert Perry      07702 631 477 robertperryphotos@gmail.com no internet usage without prior consent.          Robert Perry reserves the right to pursue unauthorised use of this image . If you violate my intellectual property you may be liable for  damages, loss of income, and profits you derive from the use of this image.

David Ilott, Dorothy-Grace Elder, Ian McKerron, Stuart McCartney, Chris Boffey, Bill Hagerty, Richard Walker

Stuart has retired as the Charity’s welfare officer, a post he has held since 1970.  The picture (to the right) shows Stuart being represented with a copy of his original application form from 1957.

Stuart was born on June 30, 1935, only child of Mary and Robert McCartney and lived for the first few years of his life in South Carntyne in Glasgow. But when Adolph Hitler started his shenanigans, his parents bundled him off to his grandparents in Dumfries and Galloway…for his safety one has to add.

To this day, Stuart loves to point out to any friend he happens to lure into the area, the mile long walk he made each weekday through the fields and main road from his grandparents farm to Hoddom Primary School in Echlefechan. On his return to Glasgow after the war, his father, a World War One veteran by lying about his age when he joined the Navy, had changed role as a time served plumber to that of a policeman rising to head the CID in the old Glasgow Police Force.

Many of Stuart’s early police contacts were men who had worked with or knew Bob McCartney.  After school at Whitehill Senior Secondary, Stuart joined the old Evening Citizen as a copyboy, then copy taker and finally news reporter under the legendary Jimmy Brough.

It was Jimmy who nicknamed him Bullet. Many have argued the reason for the name but we have to take Jimmy’s version. He said Stuart was the fastest thing on two feet in the Editorial.   Sometimes too fast. Jimmy used to recount the time he sent Stuart on a major story and watched in amazement as the young reporter vanished before the end of the briefing. Jimmy had to go to the third floor windows and yell to him as he ran across Albion Street to a waiting car: “Stuart, wait for the photographer”

National Service then intervened and on his return he met and married Irene Greenshields.  The young couple wanted to buy a home in Garrowhill but the Citizen wages would not support a loan from a mortgage company and Stuart heard there was a job going in the Scottish Daily Mail.  There he worked under Shannon Dickson and then George Sinclair who he always said was his second great tutor.  But his heart was still in Albion Street and when Jack Cupar, then news editor of the Daily Express knocked on his door in Garrowhill, Stuart showed him his Daily Mail pay-line and went back to the street for £1 week extra. Jack, along with George and Jimmy shaped what we know as Bullet.

You all know him as a friendly approachable chap but he has his moments and will knuckle down to no man.  Writing football for the Sunday Express he criticised Celtic’s style of play. Jock Stein was not amused. At the next press briefing, the great man snarled at Bullet: What right have you to write about Celtic like that? I’ve been checking up on you, McCartney. You’ve never played football at senior level.”

The room was silenced until Bullet replied: “I’ve never killed anyone either, Mr Stein. But I’ve successfully reported murder trials at the High Court.” Stein never said another word.  Sometime his quick response works against him. Watching a football match on Setanta, he became more and more frustrated by “did” and “done” and “gone” and “went” being constantly misused. He telephoned the company.  “Can’t you get commentators and interviewers who understand the Queen’s English?” he demanded. “I don’t want this crap coming into my home.”  They cut him off at halftime.

It’s not the only time he failed to see a match through. Sitting watching his beloved Rangers play their old rivals at Parkhead, he looked out the window to see a large Labrador defecating on his newly mown lawn.  He raced from his armchair…much as Jimmy Brough described…got the offending item on a scoop and trailed said dog for more than an hour round Bishopbriggs.  Eventually it entered a well appointed detached villa… the local Church of Scotland manse and when the minister opened the door Bullet emptied the scoop on the doorstep with words “I believe this belongs to you.”  And woe betide anyone who mildly criticises him. His old friend Bill Aitken tells of visiting him for dinner forty seven years ago. About ninety seconds into the visit, with outer clothes still being collected but with no sign of a refreshment, Bill, possibly unfairly, enquired if Stuart had forgotten to apply for a drinks licence.  Bullet was stunned, then said: “You will never say that to me again, you bastard.”  And he never did.

The following visit a crystal glass with a treble whisky and the requisite  amount of water was placed on the doorstep.  Bill reckons he and his wife Moira have been guests of Irene and Stuart more than a hundred times since. And to this day, a glass of whisky is picked up before they ring the doorbell.  It only failed once, when Bill stupidly told his golfing colleagues at Cawder about the practice and that he was going to Stuart’s that very evening.  The glass was there as usual. The whisky was gone. To his credit, Bullet replaced it within ninety seconds.

Sunday Herald editor  Richard Walker at Journalist Charity cheque presentation at Urban Brasserie, St Vincent St, Glasgow. Picture Robert Perry for The Herald and  Evening Times 22nd June 2015 Must credit photo to Robert Perry FEE PAYABLE FOR REPRO USE FEE PAYABLE FOR ALL INTERNET USE www.robertperry.co.uk NB -This image is not to be distributed without the prior consent of the copyright holder. in using this image you agree to abide by terms and conditions as stated in this caption. All monies payable to Robert Perry (PLEASE DO NOT REMOVE THIS CAPTION) This image is intended for Editorial use (e.g. news). Any commercial or promotional use requires additional clearance.  Copyright 2014 All rights protected. first use only contact details Robert Perry      07702 631 477 robertperryphotos@gmail.com no internet usage without prior consent.          Robert Perry reserves the right to pursue unauthorised use of this image . If you violate my intellectual property you may be liable for  damages, loss of income, and profits you derive from the use of this image.

Sunday Herald editor Richard Walker at Journalist Charity cheque presentation at Urban Brasserie, St Vincent St, Glasgow. Picture Robert Perry for The Herald and Evening Times 22nd June 2015

On sale in October ! £4.50 for 10 includes P&P

0111MATTCARD.jpg2016

This event has been postponed. More news to follow shortly

The Sports Journalists’ Association has chosen the Journalists’ Charity as its nominated good cause for 2015-2016.

The SJA will conduct fund-raising activities for the Journalists’ Charity at its various events, including British Sports Awards on December 17, and at the British Sports Journalism Awards next March.

JC-Logo-150Years-300x63 (http://www NULL.sportsjournalists NULL.co NULL.uk/sja-news/sja-chooses-journalists-charity-as-its-good-cause/attachment/jc-logo-150years-300x63/)“When Tom Clarke explained the need for substantial funding for the Journalists’ Charity, I’m delighted to say the SJA Committee agreed unanimously that we must support it as our nominated charity for the coming year,” David Walker, the SJA chairman, said.

“If we can’t support such a critical cause for journalists, who will?”

The Wales Media Awards have been held this year for the first time in over a decade. All profits will go to the Journalists’ Charity. The sponsors are Comtek, Cardiff Metropolitan University, Western Power Distribution and Effective Communications, and the partners are Quadrant Media & Communications, Cleartech, Cymen and Natasha Hirst Photography.

Wales Media Awards 2015 Winners

With thanks to Natasha Hirst for the use of these pictures:
natashahirst.co.uk (http://natashahirst NULL.co NULL.uk)

Wales Media Awards 2015

Wales Media Awards 2015 Backstage

RobinBurgess
Robin Burgess  is one  one of the regional newspaper industry’s big men  bringing his own brand of passion, integrity, wisdom and love of excellent journalism to our trade. A man who set the highest standards of performance and behaviour he has  always applauded hard work, humility, accuracy and strength of resolve.

He has been the main man at Cumbria Newspapers for 30 years. He is the fourth generation of his family to run the business. His great-grandfather started as a reporter on the Cumberland News in the 19th century, rising to editor and, eventually, buying into the company. His son, grandson and then great grandson, Robin, all succeeded him. After a short service commission in the Army, Robin was trained by Emap in East Anglia, before returning to Cumbria in 1976 and taking over as chief executive in 1985. During his tenure the CN group has thrived … it acquired titles, grew its revenue and moved into magazines, radio and, of course, digital publishing. And while other independent newspapers sold outn to the bigger groups, Robin kept CN fiercely independent and locally owned. Even during the difficult years he remained a trenchant supporter of great newspapers, great journalism and great journalists. The number of awards that his papers have collected, especially at the regional awards, over the years are a testament to his commitment to the quality of his titles. They punch well above their weight. Robin also has an eye for spotting a good editor and persuading them to shun the big-city lights to work in the far North West. Keith Sutton, Neil Hodgkinson, Donald Martin, David Helliwell – to name but a few.

Robin is respected not only for his immense journalistic role but for his community and charity responsibilities. He is steeped in Cumbria life – Chairman of Trustees of The Lake District Calvert Trust, Trustee of Carlisle Cathedral Development Trust, President of Cumbria DeafVision and church warden at All Saints Church in his home village of Scaleby.

His editors, though, talk mostly of his passionate support for his newspapers, his magazines, his journalists and his beloved Cumbria. Robin is a real newspaper man – who loves the big stories and investigations and loves it even more if they have an impact on local people.

This award is sponsored by Gorkana

marsh_3258685b

 

 

 

 

 

Ricky’s long career in journalism included 25 years as Foreign Editor of the Daily Telegraph, directing 40 foreign-based correspondents and 80 stringers across the world. He was a member of the Charity’s council from 1980 to 2013 and chairman in 1994 and 1995.

Ricky Marsh, who has died aged 88, was for 25 years The Daily Telegraph’s foreign editor, calmly directing more than 40 foreign-based correspondents as well as home reporters sent out to cover specific stories – and some 80 stringers – around the world.

It was an efficient, predictable and comfortable operation, untrammelled by budgetary restraints, but requiring shrewd judgment on existing stories and their likely development. Marsh and his foreign room team in Fleet Street were supportive and sympathetic to those in the field as long as their stories were filed and postings were kept manned. When a correspondent in Sudan could not contact the office, he rang Marsh at home in Brighton at 3am to say he had not been killed, as the World Service claimed. “You’ve already filed this, of course?” was Marsh’s immediate reply.

Marsh bore with the interventions from the Telegraph’s managing director Peter Eastwood. But when the paper’s Russian specialist was sent to cover a Scottish Nationalist Party meeting the day that Solzhenitsyn was expelled from the Soviet Union, he shouted at the news desk: “You silly buggers! I want him in Germany now… today!”

Unlike reporters on other papers, Marsh’s men in the field did not have their expenses queried; they were never told how and what to write, and could report on offbeat subjects, such as the popularity of Boeuf Stroganoff in Iran after the toppling of the Shah.

Ernest Henry Marsh was born on August 26 1926 and gained the nickname “Ricky” – after Rikki-Tikki-Tavi, the mongoose in The Jungle Book – when he was in the Scouts. He went to Ilford County High School before joining the Ilford Guardian on 7s 6d (37p) a week. With senior staff leaving for the Forces during the war, he was soon running the reporting on the Dagenham Post before being called up to serve underground as a “Bevin boy” in the Nottinghamshire coalfields, from which he was released after a year because of poor eyesight. He was then commissioned into the Royal Army Corps Service and became a PR officer in postwar Germany.

On being demobbed Marsh worked as a news agency reporter for British United Press and Associated Press before joining Reuters, where he received a tip about Winston Churchill’s imminent resignation. This was officially denied for some days, prompting his editor to joke: “Either Churchill goes in 48 hours or you go,” until the prime minister finally resigned.After five years as diplomatic and political correspondent, Marsh crossed Fleet Street to join the Telegraph, though an old hand warned he would not like it. But in 1961 he became foreign editor and went on to supervise the coverage of the fall of the Berlin wall, the Kennedy assassination, the Prague Spring in Czechoslovakia, Watergate and the wars in Vietnam and the Falklands. So dedicated was he to his job that he always slept with the radio on.

When Conrad Black purchased the paper in the mid-1980s, Marsh was moved to managing editor, a job for which he was ideally suited as a discreet executive who would never offer open criticism, whatever he thought privately. He took part in union negotiations, became the ombudsman and guardian of correct procedure. When a Canadian airliner was forced to land in Communist China then sent on to Hong Kong in a news blackout, a correspondent traced its passengers to a hospital where he donned a white coat to conduct his own ward round. Told about this years later Marsh gasped: “Oh, I don’t think the Press Council would have approved of that.”

In retirement he went to Glyndebourne at least twice a year, was a fan of Brighton football club and kept in touch with his correspondents’ widows. He continued to read The Daily Telegraph in hospital until the day before his death.

Ricky Marsh married, in 1956, Kay Ramsay, with whom he had two sons.

Ricky Marsh, born August 26 1926, died March 31 2015

 

RobertPeston

We are delighted to announce our special guest speaker at this year’s West Midlands  celebrity lunch will be Robert Peston, the BBC’s multi-award winning Economics Editor.

When: Friday October 16, 2015

Time: 12.30 start. Ends 15.00

Where: Banqueting Suite, Edgabston Cricket Ground, Birmingham, B5 7QU

Individual tickets : £48

Table of 10 : £450

Ticket price includes a three-course meal with a reception drink and tea or coffee.

 

To bookhttp://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/journalists-charity-west-midlands-lunch-with-robert-peston-tickets-16577166752

Queries or to request an invoice please email:  katejmcmillan@aol.com

LONDONPRESSCLUBBALLLOGO2015 Tuesday  13th October 2015

LONDON PRESS CLUB BALL 2015

Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A), Kensington

Book the date in your diary  – and book early

This year’s London Press Club Ball is taking place in the stunning surroundings of London’s Victoria and Albert Museum  – the ‘V&A’.

Last year’s Ball – attended by HRH The Countess of Wessex and London Mayor Boris Johnson – sold out in record time and raised a record sum for the Journalists’ Charity. We expect similar superlatives in 2015

So don’t delay. Book early to avoid disappointment.

It’s the networking event you won’t want to miss and the highlight of the national media’s  social calendar.

The Ball is a glittering event attended by  editors, proprietors, senior journalists, top executives, programme-makers, star columnists, and TV and radio broadcasters. It is backed by major newspaper and media groups as well as generous sponsors.

Ticket/table prices include a champagne reception, a fabulous three-course meal with wine plus entertainment and dancing. A celebrity auction will help raise funds for the Journalists’ Charity.

Visit:  www.thepressball.com (http://www NULL.thepressball NULL.com/)

For more details, bookings and sponsorship opportunities contact:E-mail: bookings@thepressball.com (bookings null@null thepressball NULL.com)

Tel: 0845 450 4195

London Press Club Ball,  c/o Relish Events,  131-151 Great Titchfield Street, London W1W 5BB (x-apple-data-detectors://5/):  0845 450 4195


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